Goodbye Old House

At the start of the year we decided to buy a house of our own, which meant saying goodbye to the home that we had started to transform into a more sustainable place to live. There were a surprising number of comments about how it seemed like such a shame to abandon all of the work that we had put into the property over the previous two years. We were encouraged to dismantle a lot of what we had built on the assumption that nobody would want to take on the workload of an extensive vegetable garden, fruit trees or chicken coop, and that by taking materials with us we could recover a lot of our costs.

As we prepared to leave, we did take some of the plants with us. These were mostly plants with sentimental value and the trees that weren’t thriving in their initial locations. However, the garden beds are all still there, the structural modifications are intact, and there is still a chicken coop with run bolted to the back of the house. For the first inspection, it even contained the chickens.

for leaseThe real estate agent was sceptical that anyone would be interested in what I considered the key selling features of the property, but she agreed that it wouldn’t hurt to leave them there and let potential tenants know that they could be removed at will. This was our chance to test a theory that maybe – just maybe – there were other renters out there who would appreciate what we had created.

The response from those potential tenants blew us away. None of the advertising for the property mentioned established fruit trees, energy efficient construction, the gardens or the coop. Nearly everyone who spoke to the agent wanted to know if the chickens would stay with the property, and they were disappointed when they were told that the chickens were moving on.

A family leased our old home at that first inspection, and we couldn’t be happier. They’re keen gardeners, and they’d never expected to have the opportunity to indulge that passion while they were renting. Their son is bursting with excitement at the thought of having chickens of his own, and their daughter can’t wait to make soup from the pumpkins that weren’t quite ripe when we moved out. Our landlords picked up a considerable rent increase from tenants who definitely plan to be of the long term variety. Most importantly for us, we have validation that there are people who would love to have a bit more sustainability in their lives if they just had the chance, and that knowledge is worth more than what we left behind.

If you’re playing along at home…

…is there something that you could create for someone else that will help them reduce their environmental impact? Please share in the comments below what you’ve been able to pass on to enrich someone else’s life.

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