Secret Women’s Business

Whenever discussions about changing the GST come up on the radio, someone will inevitably mention the tax on disposable menstrual products and loudly protest that this is a tax on being a woman. My initial reaction is always to snort and shake my head, before I remind myself that many women don’t know that there are easy and considerably cheaper alternatives are out there. These alternatives aren’t going to see a woman handing over money month after month, and so we don’t have to pay a tax for our fertility.

Cloth Menstrual Pads

Cloth Menstrual Pads.I bought this set of cloth pads nearly 15 years ago. There were four of the small pads, four of the medium ones, and two of the long ones. The wings on them have snap studs and fold around the outside of the underwear to stay in place. The smaller pad is shaped while the two larger sizes fold out so that an additional piece of towelling can be added for days when it is needed. The longest one is for sleeping and very heavy days, although I have rarely needed to use them.

Keeping them clean felt daunting when I first started to use them. Now I just throw them into a bucket of cold water – usually saved from the shower – and dump the whole lot onto the floor of the shower when I’m in there. The running water rinses out pretty much everything, and I can throw them into the washing machine with a regular heavy load.

When I bought them I paid $130 for the set. How I can remember that is beyond me. A quick check of current supermarket prices suggests that the current disposable pad price for a period is roughly $5 each month. Not only have I saved hundreds of disposable pads from being manufactured, transported and disposed of, but my cloth pads paid for themselves in two years. When the time comes to replace any of them, I plan to carefully pull apart one of each and use it as a pattern to make some replacements, which should save me a lot of additional money.

Menstrual Cups

For women who prefer tampons instead of pads, the reusable alternative is a menstrual cup. I haven’t used one of these myself, but they’re quite popular. The menstrual cup is inserted just like a tampon. The blood collects inside the cup, which can be removed, emptied, and reinserted. They cost around $35 dollars per cup and have a life expectancy of around 10 years. Based on current supermarket prices, you’d financially break even at around 100 tampons, notwithstanding the environmental difference in using a reusable product instead of disposable ones.

If you’re playing along at home…

…have you tried reusable products to manage your periods? Please share in the comments below how the experience differed from using disposable products and any lessons you learned in the process.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s